Grand Canyon National Park

The drive into the Grand Canyon was austere. Not that a drive can be strict or severe, but it was all desert land. For someone like me who doesn’t spend any time at all in the desert…ever… this land was austere. All of this area was preserved land for the Native Americans. We saw these horses hanging out at a small outdoor shop.

Our first view of a canyon wasn’t actually in the national park. It was at a viewpoint near where the horses were and gave a preview of what was to come.

Then we entered the park along the South Rim…and this is what we saw.

It’s kind of spectacular. The Grand Canyon has a 6,000 foot elevation change from the Colorado River up to the highest point on the North Rim.

If that isn’t enough to impress you, the Grand Canyon is 277 miles long and up to 18 miles wide. About 2 billion years of geological change has exposed the earth as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels cut through a gazillion rock layers.

I tried to capture the vastness of the park using the panoramic setting on my camera.

I promise it’s even more impressive in person.

We found a museum along the 26 mile South Rim drive dedicated to the Native Americans who once roamed freely in this area and called it their home.

Just behind the museum, there were archaeological ruins of some Native American dwellings.

We got incredibly lucky with the weather. The sun was out, the sky was blue, and the visibility was pretty great.

I was such a happy camper that day!

I really enjoyed seeing the texture of the rock. Especially the ones that look like they could fit human stick figures. Or keys. Or locks.

As the afternoon went on, the colors began to really come out.

Then we watched the sunset over the Canyon.

 

It was breathtaking. We decided to come back.

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